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Jacob Cook
Jacob Cook

The Gift of Anger: How to Live a Nonviolent Life in a Violent World with My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi's Teachings


The Gift of Anger: And Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi




Have you ever wondered what it would be like to learn from one of the most influential and revered figures in history? What if you could spend two years living with him and absorbing his wisdom? That's exactly what Arun Gandhi did when he was a teenager. He stayed with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi, at his ashram in India, where he learned valuable lessons that changed his life forever.




READ BOOK The Gift Of Anger And Other Lessons From My Grandfather Mahatma 13



In this book, The Gift of Anger: And Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi, Arun Gandhi shares ten of these lessons with us. He recounts his personal experiences with his grandfather, who taught him how to transform anger into positive energy, how to speak up for himself and others, how to appreciate solitude and silence, how to know his own worth, how to be honest and truthful, how to respect nature and resources, how to practice nonviolent parenting, how to be humble and strong, how to follow the principles of nonviolence, and how to face challenges and difficulties with courage and resilience.


This book is not only a tribute to Mahatma Gandhi's legacy, but also a guide for anyone who wants to live a more peaceful, meaningful, and fulfilling life. Here are some of the key lessons that Arun Gandhi learned from his grandfather:


Lesson 1: Use Anger for Good




Arun Gandhi was often angry as a child. He was angry at the racism he faced in South Africa, where he was born. He was angry at the bullying he endured at school. He was angry at the injustice he witnessed in the world. He often reacted to his anger by fighting back or running away.


When he came to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of dealing with anger. He told him that anger is like electricity. It can be used for good or evil. It can light up a room or destroy it. He said that we should not be ashamed of anger, but we should be ashamed of the way we abuse it. He advised him to write down his anger on a piece of paper and then analyze it later. He said that this would help him understand the cause of his anger and find a constructive solution for it.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to use his anger for good. He learned to channel his anger into action that would bring about positive change. He learned to fight for his rights and the rights of others without resorting to violence or hatred. He learned to use his anger as a motivator and a catalyst for social justice.


Lesson 2: Don't Be Afraid to Speak Up




Arun Gandhi was also shy and timid as a child. He was afraid to express his opinions and feelings. He was afraid to disagree with others or challenge authority. He was afraid to speak up for himself or others who were oppressed or mistreated.


When he came to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of communicating. He told him that silence is not always golden. He said that sometimes silence is cowardice and complicity. He said that we have a duty to speak up when we see something wrong or unjust. He said that we have a right to voice our opinions and beliefs, as long as we do so respectfully and peacefully. He said that we have a responsibility to educate ourselves and others about the issues that affect us and the world.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to speak up. He learned to overcome his fear of confrontation and criticism. He learned to assert himself and defend his values and principles. He learned to speak up for the voiceless and the marginalized. He learned to communicate effectively and persuasively.


Lesson 3: Appreciate Solitude




Arun Gandhi was also restless and bored as a child. He was used to the comforts and distractions of modern life. He was used to having friends, toys, games, books, movies, music, and other forms of entertainment. He was used to being busy and stimulated all the time.


When he came to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of living. He told him that solitude is not loneliness. He said that solitude is a gift and a blessing. He said that solitude is a time for reflection and introspection. He said that solitude is a time for meditation and prayer. He said that solitude is a time for learning and growth.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to appreciate solitude. He learned to enjoy his own company and find peace and clarity in silence. He learned to meditate and pray regularly and connect with his inner self and a higher power. He learned to read and write extensively and expand his knowledge and skills. He learned to grow as a person and as a soul.


Lesson 4: Know Your Own Worth




Arun Gandhi was also insecure and doubtful as a child. He was unsure of himself and his abilities. He was influenced by the opinions and expectations of others. He was compared to his grandfather and felt inadequate and unworthy.


When he came to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of thinking. He told him that he is unique and valuable. He said that he has a purpose and a potential. He said that he has talents and gifts that no one else has. He said that he should not let others define him or limit him. He said that he should not compare himself to others or compete with them.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to know his own worth. He learned to accept himself and love himself unconditionally. He learned to recognize his strengths and work on his weaknesses. He learned to pursue his passions and interests without fear or hesitation. He learned to be confident and proud of who he is.


Lesson 5: Lies Are Clutter




Arun Gandhi was also dishonest and untrustworthy as a child. He often lied to avoid trouble or get what he wanted. He often cheated on exams or assignments. He often stole things from others or from stores.


When he came to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of behaving. He told him that lies are clutter. He said that lies create confusion and chaos in our minds and in our lives. He said that lies damage our relationships and our reputation. He said that lies hurt ourselves and others. He said that we should always be honest and truthful, even when it is hard or inconvenient.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to be honest and truthful. He learned to admit his mistakes and apologize for them sincerely. He learned to take responsibility for his actions Lesson 6: Waste Is Violence




Arun Gandhi was also wasteful and greedy as a child. He often threw away things that he did not need or want. He often bought things that he could not afford or use. He often consumed more than he required or shared.


When he came to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of consuming. He told him that waste is violence. He said that waste harms the environment and the society. He said that waste deprives others of their basic needs and rights. He said that we should always be mindful and grateful for what we have and use it wisely and sparingly.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to be mindful and grateful. He learned to reduce his consumption and reuse his possessions. He learned to recycle his waste and compost his organic matter. He learned to donate his surplus and help his community. He learned to live simply and sustainably.


Lesson 7: Practice Nonviolent Parenting




Arun Gandhi was also a parent of four children. He often struggled with raising them in a nonviolent way. He often faced dilemmas and challenges in balancing his love and discipline, his expectations and acceptance, his guidance and freedom.


When he became a parent, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of parenting. He told him that nonviolent parenting is not passive or permissive. He said that nonviolent parenting is active and assertive. He said that nonviolent parenting is based on respect and trust, not on fear and control. He said that nonviolent parenting is about nurturing and empowering, not about dominating and manipulating.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to practice nonviolent parenting. He learned to communicate with his children openly and honestly. He learned to listen to their feelings and needs attentively and empathetically. He learned to set boundaries and rules clearly and consistently. He learned to encourage their strengths and talents positively and constructively.


Lesson 8: Humility Is Strength




Arun Gandhi was also proud and arrogant as a young man. He often thought that he knew everything and was better than others. He often ignored or dismissed the opinions and feedback of others. He often refused to admit or correct his errors and faults.


When he grew up, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of being. He told him that humility is strength. He said that humility is not weakness or inferiority. He said that humility is the recognition of one's limitations and imperfections. He said that humility is the willingness to learn from others and improve oneself.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's advice and learned to be humble. He learned to acknowledge his ignorance and mistakes humbly and gracefully. He learned to seek advice and guidance from others respectfully and sincerely. He learned to appreciate the diversity and complexity of life humbly and gratefully.


Lesson 9: The Five Pillars of Nonviolence




Arun Gandhi was also curious and eager to learn more about nonviolence as a philosophy and a practice. He often asked his grandfather questions about the principles and methods of nonviolence. He often wanted to know how to apply nonviolence in different situations and contexts.


When he showed interest, Mahatma Gandhi taught him the five pillars of nonviolence. He told him that nonviolence is not just the absence of violence, but the presence of love, truth, justice, peace, and harmony. He explained each pillar as follows:



  • Love: Nonviolence is based on love for all living beings, regardless of their differences or conflicts.



  • Truth: Nonviolence is based on truthfulness in thought, word, and deed, regardless of the consequences or challenges.



  • Justice: Nonviolence is based on fairness and equality for all, regardless of their status or power.



  • Peace: Nonviolence is based on harmony and cooperation among all, regardless of their interests or goals.



  • Harmony: Nonviolence is based on balance and integration of all aspects of life, regardless of their contradictions or tensions.



Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's teachings and learned the five pillars of nonviolence. He learned to cultivate love, truth, justice, peace, and harmony in his heart and mind. He learned to practice love, truth, justice, peace, and harmony in his actions and interactions. He learned to promote love, truth, justice, peace, and harmony in his family and society.


Lesson 10: You Will Be Tested




Arun Gandhi was also aware and realistic about the difficulties and dangers of living a nonviolent life. He often witnessed his grandfather being attacked and criticized by his opponents and enemies. He often saw his grandfather being betrayed and abandoned by his friends and allies. He often experienced his grandfather being jailed and tortured by the authorities and the police.


When he faced these hardships, Mahatma Gandhi taught him a different way of coping. He told him that he will be tested. He said that he will face resistance and opposition from those who do not understand or agree with him. He said that he will face temptation and corruption from those who want to lure or bribe him. He said that he will face failure and disappointment from those who do not support or follow him.


Arun Gandhi followed his grandfather's teachings and learned to cope with the tests. He learned to remain calm and composed in the face of adversity and hostility. He learned to remain firm and faithful in the face of seduction and deception. He learned to remain hopeful and optimistic in the face of defeat and despair.


Conclusion




The Gift of Anger: And Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi is a book that offers us a rare glimpse into the life and teachings of one of the most remarkable and inspiring leaders of all time. Arun Gandhi shares with us the lessons that he learned from his grandfather, who taught him how to live a nonviolent life in a violent world. These lessons are not only relevant for our personal lives, but also for our collective future. They can help us overcome our anger, fear, hatred, greed, violence, and other negative emotions that are destroying ourselves and our planet. They can help us cultivate love, truth, justice, peace, harmony, and other positive emotions that are healing ourselves and our planet. They can help us create a world where everyone can live with dignity, freedom, equality, and happiness.


If you are interested in learning more about this book and its author, here are some frequently asked questions and answers:


FAQs





Q: Who is Arun Gandhi?


  • A: Arun Gandhi is the fifth grandson of Mahatma Gandhi. He was born in 1934 in Durban, South Africa. He lived with his grandfather at his ashram in India from 1946 to 1948. He is a journalist, activist, speaker, and author. He founded the M.K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence in 1991.



Q: What is the main message of the book?


  • A: The main message of the book is that anger is not a negative emotion that we should suppress or avoid, but a positive emotion that we should use for good. Anger can motivate us to take action against injustice, oppression, violence, and other evils in the world.



Q: How can we apply the lessons from the book in our daily lives?


A: We can apply the lessons from the book in our daily lives by following these steps:


- Identify the source of our anger and write it down.


- Analyze the cause of our anger and find a constructive solution for it.


- Speak up for ourselves and others who are wronged or harmed.


- Enjoy solitude and silence as a time for reflection and meditation.


- Know our own worth and value ourselves and our abilities.


- Be honest and truthful in everything we say and do.


- Respect nature and resources and avoid wastefulness and greed.


- Practice nonviolent parenting by communicating with respect and trust.


- Be humble and acknowledge our limitations and imperfections.


- Follow the five pillars of nonviolence: love, truth, justice, peace, harmony.


  • - Cope with the tests that we will face by remaining calm, firm, hopeful.



Q: Where can we buy the book?


  • A: We can buy the book from various online platforms such as Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, or Google Books.



Q: How can we learn more about Mahatma Gandhi?


A: We can learn more about Mahatma Gandhi by reading his autobiography The Story of My Experiments with Truth , his collected works The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi , or other biographies such as Gandhi: A Life by Yogesh Chadha or Gandhi Before India by Ramachandra Guha.


I hope you enjoyed reading this article and learned something new and useful from it. I hope you will try to apply the lessons from this book in your own life and see the positive changes that they can bring. I hope you will share this article with your friends and family and spread the message of nonviolence and peace. 71b2f0854b


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